Friday, September 30, 2016

The Brass Bull (OSR Monster)

Although The Brass Bull is written with a 1950’s B-Movie setting, it can easily be transported to other times and settings such as Victorian pulp, 1920’s weird horror, modern, and fantasy.

The Brass Bull
The brass bull, also known as the brazen bull or the bronze bull, was a torture and execution device devised by the ancient Greeks.. The first brass bull was constructed by Perillos of Athens for the tyrant-king Phalaris of Akragas, in modern Sicily. Perillos cast hollow, life-size bronze statue of a bull, with a door in its side. Those to suffer the fate of the brass bull were locked into the device and a fire was set beneath the bull. The metal was slowly heated until it became white-hot, suffocating and roasting the condemned to death in the bull’s brass belly. To add a gruesome, yet artistic touch, a series of elaborate tubes in the brass bull’s head converted the victim’s screams into the semblance of a bull’s bellowing.

The Bull still contains the bones of the executed, sealed inside of the bronze device. The trapped spirit of the victim, a thief and traitor, has gone mad from the agonizing horror of his death and the millennia spent trapped in the bull. In its tormented and confused state, it animates the brass bull and goes on a rampage goring and stomping any in its path.

When the bull is animated ghostly wisps of smoke waft from the rolling brass eyes, from the mouth and nose holes. The sound of hollow bellowing mixed with a faint whispering in Ancient Greek emanate from the bulls mouth and nose.

The Brass Bull
AC:  14
HD:  6
ATTACKS: Gore (1d8) and Kick/Stomp (1d6)
SAVE: 12
SPECIAL: Charge, Fire Breath, Regeneration and Immunities.
MOVE: 15

The Bull attacks twice per round goring with it's horns and stomping and kicking with its hooves.

Charge 
If the Bull has at least 60' to charge can make one charge attack and if successful does triple gore damage if it hits (3d8.)

Fire Breath
Three times per day the Bull can breathe fire in a stream 50' long in a 30' arc. Any caught in the stream take 6d6 damage. A Save (vs Breath Weapon) drops the damage by 1/2. IF the Save is made by 5 or more over the target number the victim takes 0 damage.

Regeneration and Immunities
The Bull regenerates 2 hp per round as the brass pulls itself back together with a scraping metallic noise.
It takes minimum damage from normal weapons. Electricity and cold does only half damage. It is immune to fire.
It only takes full damage from magic and bronze weapons.

Undead
The Bull is immune to charm, hold, and sleep spells. 

Laying the Ghost to Rest
The ghost can only be put to rest if the bones are removed from the bull and soaked in the blood of a bull sacrificed to the god Dionysus. When the bones are completely submerged the Bull de-animates as the restless spirit moves on.

A B-Movie Adventure Seed
Here is all I had written so far. At some point I hope to fully flesh it out.

Setup
Plainsville, USA
Late October, 1955
Friday night.

A perfectly intact brass bull was found six months ago at an archaeological dig funded by the small state college in Plainsville, USA. The expedition, led by Professor Charles Wingate, head of the Plainsville archaeological program and curator of the local museum, discovered the bull while digging in the remains of a small Greek settlement on a small island off of the Greek coast. 

The brass bull they discovered is the only known bull to still contain its victims remains still sealed inside of the device. The university and museum, after several months of legal red-tape, have secured it for display in the small town with the hope that the attraction will bring more government grants and scholarly interest for both institutes. The museum has been keeping the true nature of the exhibit a secret, building media attention with the mystery of what was discovered. The mystery angle has been a smash hit, garnering the academic and media attention the board of directors, and especially Professor Wingate, greatly desired.

Everything was going just dandy, until last night, the night before the grand opening, when Professor Wingate, after drinking a bit much brandy, decided to open the hatch in the side of the brass bull to study the remains of the victim first hand. Unfortunately, opening the brass bull awakened the trapped spirit of the victim inside and the maddened spirit animated the brass bull and stomped and gored Professor Wingate to death. It then proceeded to do the same to the two museum guards who ran to the Professor’s aide after hearing his screams, the bellowing of the bull, and the destruction of the Greek room during the spirit’s rampage.

Now, the exhibit has been sealed from prying eyes, the big opening cancelled, and the reason for the deaths has been as mysterious as the new exhibit.

Crime Scene:
(Hoof marks - far heavier than any normal animal and tearing up the flooring, brass tip broken off into body, etc.)…. Try to mislead PC’s into thinking it was a Minotaur stature also in museum.

PC’S Involvement
Students/ Friends of the Professor
Investigators
Reporters

Locations
Rooms in the Museum
Greek
Roman
Egyptian
Dinosaur
Caveman
Offices
Storage (massive)
Reception
Library
Café
Gift Shop

Museum grounds
Museum neighborhood

Suggested Events
Entering the museum
Avoiding guards
The next murders
Rampage

Basic Timeline
April, 1955
An intact brass bull, discovered in a Greek settlement by the Plainsville State College archeological dig led by Prof. Charles Wingate, is discovered. 

Early October, 
After six months of red tape the museum is allowed to take the brass bull home for exhibition.
The museum begins work on the top secret exhibit. Speculation is rampant in Plainsville over what the exhibition will be.

Late October
The night before the exhibit is to open, the Professor and two guards are found, murdered.
The exhibition is shut down for investigation.





Friday, September 23, 2016

What's Up

Getting my navel rules finally organized and put online was a big step for me. Next up I'm looking to revise my Mythos & Mayhem rule set with updates to the classes, the slight revision of my automobile rules and posting my aeroplane rules, as well as reorganizing relevant posts on the M&M page on this blog. While doing this I'll be typing in my Dunham Vale setting which goes hand-in-hand with this. I have several days coming up the next few weeks so hopefully I'll be getting it done shortly and put it up here on the blog.

Thursday, September 22, 2016

OSR Pirates: Ships, Sailing, and Naval Combat



This played well when I tested it.
No doubt there will be some tinkering along the line. I always tinker. It's an obsession.

I have been tinkering with my own Naval rules for  while. I have at least a dozen different naval rules from incredibly rules light to Rolemaster and GURPS. I've read and digested them all but they aren't quite what I am wanting for my own games. Thus I have tinkered and come up with some ideas, many of them familiar, for a usable light rules system easily compatible with Basic, Labyrinth Lord, Swords & Wizardry, etc.

I'm going for familiar concepts and fun easy to use rules, not a hardcore lesson in minute details of ships, cannon, and life at sea circa the golden age of piracy.

First we'll look at some basic ship types. I am no expert and there were many conflicting sources of ships. I boiled that down to a few recognizable ship types in the Pirate genre.
Roll with it.

Following that is the basic Sailing rules and the actual combat rules with cannon stats, etc.


SHIPS STATISTICS
HP
Just like character hit points.
0 HP or less the ship sinks in 1d10 + 6 rounds.

AC
Armor class to hit the ship. Modified by the Captain's Sailing bonus and Ship Maneuverability bonus. .
Faster ships receive an AC bonus of +1 for each 10' it is faster.

Maneuverability 
How nimble the ship is. It adds to the ship's AC and to attacks against other ships.

Speed
Basic travel feet per round. This represents an average movement. Windy weather (or lack of) can greatly affect the speed of a ship. (See Wind Conditions, Labyrinth Lord, pg 57.)
Daily movement equals the movement rate x 0.6 in miles per hour.

Turn Rate
Ships cannot just turn on a dime; turning takes time and effort.

Sailing Ships
A turn takes one round to give the order and prep for turn.
To turn ninety degrees takes two rounds past the prep round. (Rounds one and two.)
To turn one hundred eighty degrees takes another two rounds past the ninety degree turn. (Rounds three and four.)
While turning the ship continues to move forward in the direction it is turning.



Auxiliary/Rowing Ships
One round to ninety degrees, two rounds total for one hundred eighty degrees.

Crew
The number of men to operate the ship at full efficiency.
Having less than a full amount of crew can severly effect the operation of the ship. Speed is reduced, Sailing checks receive a negative modifier, the time taken to turn the ship, effect repairs, and load guns increases, and the number of guns in a fight decreases.
Passengers 
How many non-crew (troops, paying passengers, etc) can comfortably be carried. For every passenger space not taken up one ton of cargo may be added.

Cargo
The absolute maximum weight of cargo carried by the ship in tons without causing problems. For every ton of cargo space not used one extra passenger can be comfortably lodged.

Guns
Total number of guns that can be fired in a salvo and their facing. Broadside is the number on one side of  ship. There is the same number (minus damaged cannon) on the opposite side,.

Auxiliary Ships 

























1-Mast Ships 

























2-Mast Ships 






























3-Mast Ships 































4-Mast Ships 












5-Mast Ships 


SAILING 
The Sailing Check
This is the most important check for the characters running things on the ship. It is a simple Intelligence check with modifiers.
The Sailor class gains a bonus to this check at certain levels. NPC's experienced at life on the sea will certainly be assigned Sailing bonuses by the DM.

For opposed Sailing checks both parties roll an Intelligence check with the Sailing bonus and other bonuses/penalties.

The best roll under Int wins. If both made the check by the same amount then  it is a tie and continues into the next round with no bonus to either.

Navigation
Intelligence +Sailing bonus. +/- chart quality bonuses.
For the most part sailing from one place to the other is pretty straight forward with decent charts and navigating instruments. This is left very open for the DM to add challenges and encounters getting from one place to another. Pirates, creatures, inclement weather, mutiny, etc can all make for a challenging voyage.

Spotting other Ships
Ships on the open sea can be spotted miles away. The higher your elevation above the water the further away you can spot other ships, etc.

Spotting a ship is automatic if the lookouts are paying attention. The distance at which they can be spotted are given below in miles and is adjusted for lighting and weather conditions.

To keep it simple take the base spotter location which shows how far out to water in miles a spotter can see.
Multiply this by Light modifiers  then multiply by Weather modifiers.

For example: A Brigantine's lookout in the crow's nest can see out to 24 miles on a normal day. He is on duty during  a cloudy night  with light rain (24 miles x 0.30 x 0.75) = 5.4 miles maximum to spot another ship.
A ship running with it's lights out may require a surprise check by the lookout at the DM's discretion.


NAVAL COMBAT
Naval Combat Rounds are standard old-school D&D rounds with the following phases:
Tactical Roll
Initiative
Movement
Attack

Tactical Roll 
Opposed Sailing checks.
Winner gets a +2 bonus to Sailing checks for the round. This affects iniative, attacks, flee/pursue, etc. Anything involving the Sailing ability.

Initiative
1d6+ Int Bonus + Sailing bonus (including Tactical bonus if won ) + Ship Maneuver bonus.

Movement
Ships move in reverse order of initiative, so that the winner gets to react to the movements of his opponent.
Every ship has a speed measured in feet which the ship can move per round. This can be modified by daily wind conditions.
(See Wind Conditions, Labyrinth Lord, pg 57.)

Attacking
1d20 +Int bonus +Sailing bonus (including Tactical bonus if won ) + Ship Maneuver bonus.
With a successful hit the enemy ship takes damage to its ship hit points.

Sinking Ships
At 0 HP or less. the ship sinks in 1d10 + 6 rounds.

Repair
1 ship hit points per 5 men per turn. This task requires full attention, so any crew involved in repair cannot take any other action during a turn repairing a vessel.

For complicated repairs (steering, extensive hull damage, etc as DM sees fit) a foreman must be in charge and must make a Repair check to guide the crew and gain the normal daily repaired ship hit points,

Ship's Guns
Demi-culverin: The smallest of the anti-ship guns , firing a 9-pound shot. Sometimes called a 9-pounder.
Damage: 1d3,  Range: 300'
Culverin: The most common ship’s weapon during this time period, firing an 18-pound shot.
Damage: 1d4, Range: 450'
Demi-cannon: A large-bore weapon firing a 24-pound shot.
Damage: 1d6, Range: 600'
Cannon: The largest of the ship-mounted weapons—a massive gun that fires a 45-pound shot.
Damage: 1d8, Range: 600'

The damage listed is what the guns do to ship hit points. This is multiplied x5 vs normal character hit points. Range has five increments. Each increment past the first has a cumulative -2 penalty to hit.

Reload Time
6 rounds (1 minute) for culverin.
12 rounds (2 minutes) for cannon.

Salvo  (multiple guns)
Hit bonus: +1 per 4 guns (round up)
Damage: Normal damage x number of guns in salvo.

Chainshot
If a critical hit is gained roll a 1d6.
1-5: Sail damage as per critical hit chart.
6: Mast damage as per critical hit chart.

Grapeshot
+2 to hit. No ship damage. If a crit is gained 2d6 crew are hit for normal Cannon damge.

Hot Coals
If a critical hit is gained roll a 1d6.
1-5: Ship fire to enemy as per critical fail chart.
6: Major fire to enemy as per critical fail chart.

Critical Hit
Total attack roll and bonus +5 over AC needed to hit.
With gun fire each crit causes 1d6 crewman to be hit for normal (and usually lethal) gun damage as well as a roll on the critical hit table.

Critical Failure
Natural 1 on the d20 roll.
A roll on the critical failure table must be made.

Critical Hit
1d6 crew are hit for cannon damage (roll normal Gun damage dice x 5) and the attacker rolls on the chart below.
1. 1d6 extra crew are hit for cannon damage.
2. 1d6 guns destroyed.
3. Sail damage!-1 to move, -1 to Maneuver rolls. This stacks each time this is rolled and with mast damage.
4. Hold hit! 1d100 percent of cargo is lost.
5. x2 damage to ship from attack.
6. Pilot hit. -2 to Maneuver rolls for 1d4 rounds in the chaos.
7. 2d6 extra crew are hit for gun damage.
8. Mast hit! 1/2 move, -4 to Maneuver rolls. This stacks each time this is rolled and with sail damage.
9. x3 damage to ship from the attack.
10. Powder magazine hit! 1d6x10 damage to ship from explosion. 3d6 extra crew hit with this damage as well.

Critical Failure
1. Guns malfunction. 1d6 guns are out of the fight until repaired.
2. Ship fire! Ship takes 2d6 damage per round until fire is put out. It takes a minimum of 5 crew members 3 turns to douse it. For every five additional crew members, this time can be reduced by 1 turn to a minimum of 1 turn.
3. Hit allied ship for normal cannon damage. If this is not applicable roll again,.
4. Guns misfire! No shot is fired due to dampness, faulty load, etc. Normal reload to fire next volley.
5. Major fire! Ship takes 4d6 damage per round until fire is put out. It takes a minimum of 5 crew members 3 turns to douse it. For every five additional crew members, this time can be reduced by 1 turn to a minimum of 1 turn.
6. Guns explosion! A gun blows up, possibly destroying those nearby. 1d3 guns are lost.

Boarding  
When two ships wish to board one another, their mutual intent makes the action succeed with no chance of failure. If only one side wishes to board, the attacking side must win an opposed Sailing check (Int check with Sailing and Ship Maneuver bonus) with a -4 penalty to the attacking side.

Normal character combat ensues when the two crews clash. Characters who are boarding another ship suffer a penalty of –2 to attack rolls and armor class.

Once crew members come into contact with one another, combat ensues following the standard combat rules.

Ram
Normal naval attack roll.
A desperate maneuver, if the attacker hits he does 6d6x5 hp damage to the enemy ship but takes half of that damage to his own ship.

Flee/Pursuit
Often a drawn out affair with each ship maneuvering towards favorable currents, manipulating rigging and sail to maximize and compete for the wind, and a variety of other tricks. Pursuits often lasted hours or even days.

Every hour the ships roll opposed Sailing checks (including the Tactical bonus if won ) + Ship's Maneuver bonus. The faster ship also gains a  +1 bonus per 10' for speed faster than the slower ship.
If successful the fleeing ship doubles it's lead on the pursuer.
If successful the pursuing ship cuts the fleeing ships lead by half.
If tied or both fail the distance remains the same.
Eventually the pursuer will catch up to the ship for an attack or will fall so far behind as to give up the chase.










Thursday, September 8, 2016

Upcoming RPG Projects

I have several projects near completion. I mostly need to organize a few notes and type up the blog entries.

Dunham Vale. A lovecraftian 1920s small South Carolina coastal town setting. Emphasis on bootlegging, subtle Mythos investigation. Peaky Blinders with a Southern Gothic slant.

Gotham 1851. A western mini-setting in Old Gotham City. Lots of name dropping and supernatural horror. Inspired by All-Star Western's run with Jonah Hex and Amadeus Arkham. Cap and ball Gunslingers and gamblers vs old west Supernatural in a familiar yet slightly different setting.

Valley of Darkness. A French setting. Inspirations include Auveroigne, Brotherhood of the Wolf, Brothers Grimm, etc. A semi- historical Supernatural sandbox deep dark woods and a lot of secrets and to be uncovered. I had a lot of fun working on this one. It's generic enough to be set anywhere from medieval through Colonial.

Literally dozens of mini-adventures. Pulp. Western. Victorian. Colonial.




Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Naunet, Goddess of The Primordial Abyss: The Slithering Doom

Found a wonderful piece of art by Dorian Cleavenger and wanted to stat it as a Lovecraftian entity.

Naunet, Goddess of The Primordial Abyss
“Hail, Naunet Protector of the void, Guardian of the abyss……”
The Egyptians had many different versions of a creation myth. In all of them, the original God sprang from Nun (also called Nu) who was described as being ‘the primordial waters’. Nun was more than an ocean, He was a limitless expanse of motionless water. Nun was portrayed as a bearded man with a blue or green body, symbolizing water and fertility. In one hand He holds a palm frond, a symbol of long life and wears another one in His hair. Since He is known as the “Father of Fathers and the Mother of Mothers” and is sometimes shown with female breasts as well, His feminine aspect is known as the Goddess Inu. In another Egyptian version of the deities, rather than have a feminine version of Nun, He is said to have a consort named Naunet (sometimes called Nunet). Naunet is considered to be the Goddess of the Primordial Abyss of the Underworld. Naunet is a member of the Ogdoad of eight primordial deities who together personify the essence of the primordial chaos before the creation of the world. The Ogdoad created from Themselves the mound upon which lay the egg from which the sun god emerged. This Sun God, named Atum, became the first God of the earth. Eventually, Atum became associated with Ra. Ra-Atum was the coming of the light to disperse the darkness of Nun and is symbolized by the Phoenix in this context. His next task was to create other gods, which He did by masturbation, not by having a mate. This was not offensive to ancient Egyptians, but in fact intensified His power in their minds.

Naunet The Slithering Doom
Myths and legend have formed trough the aeons about the ancient terror Naunet whom guards 12 gateways to 'the Primordial Abyss of the Underworld'. These 12 gateways are found in remote places in the world both on land and in the deep seas. The gateways could be portals to the Abyss, other dimensions, alien worlds and realities, etc. DM's choice.

Naunet dwells in the spaces between the gates and can emerge from any of the gates to defend them against interlopers. The myth that she 'embodies the primal womb in which the cycles of birth, life, death and rebirth are carried out. She frees all beings to follow their individual cycles of life' developed from her habit of destroying those who would seek forbidden knowledge by entering the gates and sending them onto their next life.
No. Enc.:  Unique
Alignment: Chaotic
AC: 18
HD: 15
ATTACKS: 4 Tentacles (1d8), Bite (1d10)
SPECIAL: Resistance to Damage, Tentacle Grab, Terrifying Presence, Water/Wind Buffet
SAVE: 5
MOVE: 120' (40') Slither/ 240' (80') Swim

Resistance to Damage
Naunet is only hurt by electrical, fire, or magical attacks. All others do no damage to her flesh.

Tentacle Grab
Naunet can attack with up to four tentacles per round, each doing 1d8 damage. If two or more tentacles it the same target the victim is grappled and must make a Saving Throw (vs Death) with a 4 penalty each round to break free or take 2d6 automatic damage. Grappled creatures may also be pulled to Naunet's mouth (1-2/1d6 chance) for an automatic bite doing 1d10 damage.

Terrifying Presence
Those who come within sight of Naunet must Save (vs Paralysis) or be struck with fear causing a -4/-20 percent penalty to rolls. If the Save is failed by 5+ the victim of the Terror must flee her presence and cannot attempt to approach her again for 2d6 rounds. The victim must reroll the Save when re-approaching her.

Water/Wind Buffet
Naunet can use her pseudo-wings to unbalance foes both in the water and on land by creating waves or gusts of wind to knock them off balance. It is the only attack she can take in a round she chooses to do this.

The attack is an area 30' high, 30' wide, and 100' long. Anyone caught within this are must make a Saving Throw (vs Paralysis) with a -4 penalty or be knocked back 1d6 x 10' and prone for 1d6 rounds as they recover.




Sunday, September 4, 2016

OSR Colonial and Pirate Classes with Setting Notes


Here's a few classes for a Colonial, Pirate, Napoleonic, or even a Renaissance setting.
The Cavalryman, Musketeer, Pirate, and Swashbuckler.
All are combat classes (hit/save as Fighter.)

Use with the setting rules and following classes from the Victorian setting:
Combat Classes
(Explorer) as Scout
Pugilist
Sailor
Soldier

Non-Combat Classes
(Con-Man) Scoundrel
(Crook) Burglar
(Detective) Investigator
Minister
Physician
Scholar

Here is the post on Colonial era firearms and Armor.
Here is the post on basic firearms rules.

Cavalryman
Trained cavalry troops or anyone who has skill at riding.
Hit Dice 1d8 per level up to ninth level.
Armor Permitted: Any
Weapons Permitted: Any but greatly prefer firearms and one-handed melee weapons.
Prime Attribute (5% xp bonus) Dex 13+

Horse Fighter
Cavalrymen are familiar with combat on horseback. They receive no penalty for attacks made on horseback and gain a +2 bonus to hit with melee weapons vs infantry troops.
(-2 to a non-cavalryman class rider's attack unless he makes a Ride check at -4 penalty.)

Reloading a flintlock weapon on horse moving faster than a walk normally requires a Dex check with a -4 penalty. Failure results in the powder and shot being spilled. The Cavalryman can do it with a straight Dex check.

Riding
At levels 1, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 the Cavalryman gains a cumulative +1 bonus to his riding checks (Dex) for basic riding maneuvers such as stay mounted while the horse is bucking or upset, calming and controlling the horse, guide it with his knees so the rider can shoot, etc. In addition, the Cavalryman can do the following:

On Horseback the Cavalryman gains a +1 to AC and can use his Dex bonus increase his mount's AC.

With a successful check, the Cavalryman can drop along the side of the horse for cover, gaining a +4 cover bonus to his AC. This is considered pretty dishonorable by quite a few.

With a successful check the Cavalryman can fall from a horse and take half damage (see Riding in Rules Clarifications: Miscellaneous.)

With a successful check the Cavalryman can coax the horse to leap obstacles and the Cavalryman can hang on while the animal is performing the maneuver.

Stamina
Time in the saddle has toughened the Cavalryman.
+2 to Saving Throws vs disease and poison.

Musketeer
Musketeers are combatants who have a great affinity for firearms. They are marksmen and are trained to care for their weapons. Their knowledge of firearms often makes them the default Armorer caring for the crew's weaponry. Their bonuses to hit coupled with bonuses from aiming and point blank range make them deadly in a firefight.
Hit Die Type: 1d8 per level.
Armor Permitted: Any
Weapons Permitted: Any but greatly prefer firearms.
Prime Attribute (5% experience bonus): Dexterity 13+.

Deadshot
The Musketeer receives a +1 bonus to hit with any firearm. This stacks with aiming and point blank shooting.

Fast Draw
The Musketeer can draw, ready, and fire a firearm faster. They only recieve a -2 to their shooting attacks when drawing and shooting a firearm(s) in the same round instead of a -4 penalty.

Fast Reload
The Musketeer cuts their reload time down by one round. Thus a musket or pistol can be reloaded in one round instead of two.

Firearm Repair
Anyone can attempt to fix malfunctioning or broken firearms and cannon. The Musketeer is better at it due to his familiarity with the weapons. Normally this is an Int check, the Musketeer receives a cumulative +1 bonus to this check at the following levels:
12 limit: 3, 6, 9, and 12.
20 limit: 5, 10, 15, and 20
The repair time is left up to the DM based on how badly the weapon is damaged and available tools and materials to fix.

Pirate
Pirates are the scourge of the seas, hunting down and stealing cargo from other ships. Most are not overly skilled at sailing but excel at combat on board ship. They can be a bloodthirsty and murderous lot but most stick to a code or article of behavior.
Hit Die Type: 1d8 per level.
Armor Permitted: Any, but Thief abilities can only be used in Leather or lighter.
Weapons Permitted: Any but prefer short one-handed weapons for ship combat.
Prime Attribute (5% experience bonus): Dexterity 13+.

Close Quarter Fighter
The cramped quarters below decks hinder a man's fighting abilities (-2 to attacks) unless he is experienced with such things. The Pirate recieves no penalty for fighting in cramped spaces including below deck, in tunnels, etc.

Hardy
Pirates lead a rough life and harden to it quickly or die. They add a +2 to  saving throws against disease and poison.

Thief Abilities
Being a tricksy and dangerous lad the Pirate can Hide in Shadows, Move Silently, and Climb Walls as well as a Thief of an equal level.

He can also Backstab as a Thief with the usual bonuses and extra damage.

Swashbuckler
Hit Die Type: 1d8 per level.
Level and Attack as: Fighter
Save as: Fighter
Armor Permitted: Leather or lighter. Their abilities can only be used in Leather or lighter.
Weapons Permitted: Any but prefer one-handed melee. Their usually high Dexterity makes them capable two weapon fighters.
Prime Attribute (5% experience bonus): Dexterity 13+.

Climbing
As a Thief of equal level. This can also be used as the chance for maneuvers such as swinging from chandeliers and other acrobatic derring-do.

Florentine
Can use two melee weapons with no penalty to the primary hand and only a -2 to the off-hand. In addition the Swashbuckler can choose to not take the off-hand attack and defend witih he weapon, gaining him a +1 AC bonus that round as if he had a shield.

Light on the Feet
When wearing leather or lighter armors the Swashbuckler receives a +2 bonus to their AC.

Quick with a Blade
The Swashbuckler is a Dexterity based fighter. He may use his Dexterity bonus instead of his Strength bonus for melee attacks.

Colonial Horror Games
The Colonial period is  well suited to horror games. Sleepy Hollow, Pirates of the Caribbean, Brotherhood of the Wolf, etc are a few examples.

Here's a few classes and rules for this genre:
Magician
Witch
Folkloric and Infernal Magic
Ritual Magic Option (anyone can cast)
Fear and Madness
Victorian Weird and Horror Races
Vampire PC's  ala Dark Shadows

Classes for Period Games. Notes and variations on a theme.

A bit rambling but felt like explaining a few design choices in my period game classes.
I try to keep my period games less power-gamey than pure D&D high fantasy, thus my preference for, and I loathe to use his term but it's Sunday and my brain is in chill mode, 'realistic' classes. Less powerful and fantastic. More grounded in 'reality.' The classic high fantasy versus low fantasy.

Thus traditional D&D Thieves, with their multitude of abilities are split into The Con-Man/Gambler and Burglar/Crook etc. More focused classes. Not a Fantasy James Bond or Batman do it all.  On the flip side I also like my players to have characters who are more competent. That's the man reason I went to my formula of 10 + level (or half level) + ability score modifier for most class abilities/'skills'. Percentiles can still be used as in traditional games but my players found the d20 mechanic smoother for their needs, I like it as well. Sometimes nostalgia hits and I'll refer to percentiles or use the generic 'as a Thief of equal level' to make some of the write ups more accessible to traditional DM's. Such was the case with my Revised and New Fantasy Classes.

The period games classes for Victorians, Westerns, Colonial, Pirates, and even Modern are designed to be used with each setting as needed. That's why most of the classes in different settings (such as the Gambler and Con-Man) are the same, just renamed for flavor, variations on a theme.

The real change is in the setting. Again, I like more competent characters and want my players to enjoy being pretty decent at things when beginning a character, thus for combat I changed the hit bonus to a Combat/Non-Combat class orientation and they still have a better chance to hit than in most traditional D&D games (+1 per level for Combat/+1 per 2 levels for Non-Combat). The Western Setting has everyone using the +1 to hit per level. Thus porting over a Physician requires that slight adjustment but it is fitting for that setting to have the Physician PC be able to fight better. It's a genre convention. Classic Victorian and Colonial Physician characters are non-combat roles.

OSR Victorian Classes Redux

As with my other recent posts I'm revisiting past game material with updates.
They are interchangeable with the Western classes and I've added a few new ones such as the Pugilist and Sailor as well as splitting the Scoundrel into the Con-Man and Crook.
Redone Pulp classes and rules will get their own post soon.

The original post is found here.
Victorian weaponry can be found here. The Western weaponry works as well.

VICTORIAN CLASSES
Attribute Bonuses/Penalties:
Either the standard Swords & Wizardry +1 or Labyrinth Lord’s +1 to +3.

Hit Points:
Maximum HP at first level. (OPTION: For grittier horror games, HP limit of 5 levels.)

Save:
Combat Classes: As Fighter; Non-Combat Classes: As Cleric.

Attack:
Combat Classes: +1 hit/level (Max +15); Non-Combat Classes: + 1 hit/2 levels.

Experience:
Each class advances as a Fighter.

Level Limit:
12 or 20 based on Campaign type.
For more 'realistic' games the characters are limited to level 12. They are still competent but do not reach the more pulpish or cinematic characters of a level 20 game.
In my games Call of Cthulhu and Historical Western games are level 12, Modern Fantasy and Spaghetti Westerns are level 20.

Class Ability Formula:
12 limit: 12+ level+Ability Score Bonus , 20 limit: 10+1/2 level+Ability Score Bonus.
Untrained: Ability check for Driving, Climbing, etc, 5 + Ability Modifier for trained Abilities such as Mechanic, Open Locks, etc.
DM will add or subtract modifiers for ease/difficulty of task.

Multiclassing:
Multiclassing is allowed for a stronger skill set. To hit bonuses and Hit Points add on normally. For Saving Throws take the best of the two classes. Class abilities do not stack use the best of both.

Armor Class:
Normal Armor class, and modifiers are used.
Firearms ignore the first four points of personal armor. For example: Plate –6 [+6] would only give protection of –2 [+2].

Starting Money:
Characters are assumed to have come into money either by work or inheritance and begin with 3d6 x 20 dollars/pounds as first level characters. Characters starting off at higher levels receive an amount of beginning money equal to 3d6 + the characters level x 20 or whatever their DM feels is appropriate to the game.
Roll with it.

COMBAT CLASSES

Cowboy
Those skilled at riding and working on horseback this class represents cowboys of the American West, cavalrymen of any national army, South American gauchos, etc.
Hit Die Type: 1d8 per level up to 9th, +2 hp at 10+.
Armor Permitted: Any
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% experience bonus): Con 13+

Riding
A Dexterity check to guide his animal. This includes situations such as staying mounted while the horse is bucking or upset, calming and controlling the horse, guide it with his knees so the rider can shoot or rope, etc.
The Cowboy gets to add a +1 bonus to Riding Dexterity checks at first level and at later levels.
12 limit: 3, 6, 9, and 12
20 limit: 5, 10, 15, and 20

In addition, the Cowboy can do the following:
Use his Dex bonus to increase his mount's AC.
With a successful check, the Cowboy can drop along the side of the horse for cover, gaining a +4 cover bonus to his AC.

With a successful check the Cowboy can fall from a horse and take half damage (see Riding in Rules Clarifications: Miscellaneous.)

With a successful check the Cowboy can coax the horse to leap obstacles and the Cowboy
can hang on while the animal is performing the maneuver.

Roping
The Cowboy receives a +2 bonus with the lariat (ranged attack).

Shooter
Being proficient with arms is a necessity on the trail. With snakes, coyotes, bandits, and rustlers you have to learn to defend yourself.
The Cowboy receives a +1 to hit with firearms.

Stamina
Riding the range toughens a man. +2 to Saving Throws vs disease and poison.

Explorer
Rugged men who live their lives taming the wilderness. This class can be used for not only the iconic Victorian explorer but also scouts, native guides, etc.
Hit Die Type: 1d8 per level up to 9th, +2 hp at 10+.
Armor Permitted: Medium and Light to use Abilities
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% experience bonus): Dexterity 13+

-1 to be surprised.
+1 to surprise.

Backstab
The Explorer, once he has found his target, is adept at attacking from surprise to kill the prey.
+4 to attack. x2 damage. x3 damage at levels 5-8. x4 damage at 9th level.
This also includes ranged attacks until the target(s) are aware they are being fired upon.

Survival
The Explorer’s ability to live off of the land and survive, this check is rolled in addition to normal foraging rolls. The DM may modify this check for plentiful or exceptionally harsh terrain. This also includes the ability to track.
12 limit: 10+ level+Int bonus.
20 limit: 10+1/2 level+Int bonus.

Gunslinger
Men who live and die by the gun. Fast with the hands and lethal. Gunman, Quick Draw Artist, Bounty Hunter, etc.
Hit Die Type: 1d8 per level up to 9th, +2 hp at 10+.
Armor Permitted: Any
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% experience bonus): Dex 13+

Fast Draw
Gunslinger gains a cumulative +1 bonus to Fast Draw initiative at first level and later levels.
12 limit: 3, 6, 9, and 12
20 limit: 5, 10, 15, and 20

The Gunslinger does not receive a -4 penalty to attack for drawing a weapon and attacking in the same round.

If group initiative is used, the Gunslinger still rolls for individual initiative (1d6+Dex Bonus.)

Fast Draw initiative is different than normal initiative. Roll 1d6 + Dex bonus + Gunslinger bonus. However, against opponents who already have their weapons in hand, the initiative total is considered to be half (round up.) The usually high Gunslinger Dex and the Gunslinger’s Fast Draw bonus will still beat many foes who are already armed and ready, even at half the normal value. Therefore, if facing down a Gunslinger who has a holstered weapon and his partner who has a pistol in hand, you would have your full Fast Draw initiative vs. the holstered gun, but only half of the number vs. the pistol already in hand.

Shooter
The bread and butter of the Gunslinger. He receives a +1 to hit with firearms.

Steely Gaze
At 1st level, the Gunslinger can intimidate a number of creatures with HD equal to his level.
The creatures must be able to see the Gunslinger’s stare to be affected. The creatures are allowed a Saving Throw to avoid this effect. Those that fail suffer a –2 to all attacks on the Gunslinger. Most will flee; only the most determined will stay and fight.
This ability can be used once per day per level.

Pugilist 
Those with training or a natural affinity towards fisticuffs and barehanded mayhem. Boxer, Brawler, Kung Fu Practitioner, etc.
Hit Die Type 1d8, After reaching 10 hit dice, the Pugilist gains only 2 hit points per level
Armor: The Pugilist only gains his AC bonus and Combo ability if in leather or lighter.
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% xp bonus) Dex 13+

Fisticuffs (Unarmed Combat)
The Pugilist hits harder and more often with his natural weapons and can defend against Melee/Unarmed attacks better than most other characters.

He gains a +1 to hit with Unarmed Attacks and receives the following bonuses while in Melee/Unarmed Combat.


Combo
The Pugilist can attack with two unarmed attacks around at no penalty. This ability can  only be used if he is only doing two unarmed attacks. It cannot be mixed with a melee or ranged attack. Use normal two-weapon rules for those situations.

KO
Once per day per 2 levels (round up) the Pugilist can fire off a haymaker/power kick/etc.
The attack is made at a -2 penalty to hit. If successful the damage is x2, x3 if a natural 20 is rolled.

Second Wind
If the Pugilist takes a full round to rest he can regain 1d4 hit points. He must do no other action in this round but rest. He cannot defend himself. His AC is 10 + light armor modifier; he receives no Dex or Fisticuffs bonus.
This ability can be used a limited number of times per day.
12 limit: 3, 6, 9, and 12.
20 limit: 5, 10, 15, and 20

Sailor
Rough tough men who make a living from the sea. Seamen, pirates, fishermen, etc.
Hit Die Type: 1d8 per level up to 9th, +2 hp at 10+.
Armor Permitted: Light
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% experience bonus): Constitution 13+

Repair
Sailors must learn to fix their vessel and it's subsystems or be stranded at sea, often in hostile and dangerous climes. This includes not only engines but navigation tools, rudders, breached hulls, etc. This differs from mechanics as it applies to large ship engines and sailing technology. It is more diverse.
To successfully repair the ship they must have the parts, take the time set by the DM, and make a successful check.
12 limit: 10+ level+Int bonus.
20 limit: 10+1/2 level+Int bonus.

Sailing
Steering and working ships from sail to engine powered. This requires an Dexterity check. This ability also includes the art of navigating or finding ones position using an Intelligence check with the Sailing bonus included. Bonuses may be given for good charts, maps, etc,
The Sailor gets to add a +1 bonus to Sailing Dexterity or Intelligence checks at first level and at later levels.
12 limit: 3, 6, 9, and 12.
20 limit: 5, 10, 15, and 20

Stamina
+2 to Saving Throws vs disease and poison.

Swimmer
+2 to Swimming (Strength) checks.

Soldier
Those who are trained to fight or have a natural ability at combat. Ruffians, soldiers, adventurers, etc.
Hit Die Type: 1d8 per level up to 9th, +2 hp at 10+.
Armor Permitted: Any
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% experience bonus): Strength 13+

Defense
The Soldier is better at avoiding damaging due to dodging, blocking, parrying, etc.
+1 to AC.

Melee Fighter
Gains a +1 to attack with melee weapons.

Shooter
He receives a +1 to hit with firearms.

NON-COMBAT CLASSES

Con-Man
Anyone who uses their quick hands and wits to make money off of the unwary or foolish. This class represents the gambler, the pick pocket, the grifter,and charlatan.
Hit Die Type 1d6 per level up to 9th, +1 hp at 10+.
Armor Permitted: Medium to Light to use Abilities.
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% experience bonus): Dexterity 13+

Backstab
When attacking with surprise, from behind, the Con-Man gains +4 to hit and inflicts double damage. At levels 5-8, damage is tripled, and from a Con-Man above level 8 such an attack inflicts quadruple damage.

Fast Talk
With a bit of conversation, the Con-Man is able to attempt to befriend, persuade, charm, or outright con an individual to his way of thinking. After 2d6 minutes of cajoling, flattering, drinking, etc. the victim of the Fast Talk must make a Saving Throw. This Saving Throw has a cumulative -1 as the Con-Man gains higher levels.
12 limit: 3, 6, 9, and 12.
20 limit: 5, 10, 15, and 20

Gambling
A gambler, a card sharp and sometimes a cheat, supplementing his living by the cards, dice, and his wits. At 1st level and at 3rd, 6th, 9th, and 12th the Con-Man gains a cumulative +1 bonus to his gambling checks.

Hear Noise
The Con-Man has honed his senses to work better in the dark. His chance to hear noise is 3 in 6 at first level increasing to 4 in 6 at 3rd level, 5 in 6 at 7th level, and 6 in 6 at 10th level.
To use this ability he must stop all activity and concentrate.

Open Locks
Con-Men are skilled at picking locks, opening safes, etc. Some are difficult and may require a penalty to the open roll.
12 limit: 10+ level+Dex bonus.
20 limit: 10+1/2 level+Dex bonus.
Good tools may grant a small bonus just as inferior tools may incur a small penalty.

Pick Pocket
The Con-Man is often called upon to manipulate small objects, such as a card, coin, derringer, or small knife in his line of work, as well as picking the occasional pocket.
12 limit: 10+ level+Dex bonus.
20 limit: 10+1/2 level+Dex bonus.

If the Con-Man fails his roll the victim has a 1-2 in 6 chance of detecting the manipulation, pick pocket attempt, etc. A Dex bonus will drop the chance to 1 in 6.

 If the Con-Man rolls a natural 20, he has been spotted by his victim or victims if he is picking a pocket, cheating, etc.

Crook
Thieves, burglars, and hit-men. These men make their living by stealing. Some are subtle burglars while others are brutal robbers and killers.
Hit Die Type 1d6 per level up to 9th, +1 hp at 10+.
Armor Permitted: Medium to Light to use Abilities.
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% experience bonus): Dexterity 13+

Back Stab
If the Crook successfully sneaks up on an unaware target, he can add a +4 bonus to his attack, and inflict x2 dmg. At levels 5-8, damage is tripled, and from a Crook above level 8 such an attack inflicts quadruple damage. This applies to ranged and melee damage.

Climb
Almost anyone may attempt to climb vertical surfaces with good handholds but the Crook is skilled in making difficult climbs. When a Climb check is required it is a Str check. The Crook adds a +4 bonus to the Str check.
Making a climb check for unusual situations such as good handholds, slippery surfaces, etc may net a bonus or penalty from the DM.

Hear Noise
The Crook has honed his senses to work better in the dark. His chance to hear noise is 3 in 6 at first level increasing to 4 in 6 at 3rd level, 5 in 6 at 7th level, and 6 in 6 at 10th level.
To use this ability he must stop all activity and concentrate.

Open Locks
Crooks are skilled at picking locks, opening safes, etc. Some are difficult and may require a penalty to the open roll.
12 limit: 10+ level+Dex bonus.
20 limit: 10+1/2 level+Dex bonus.
Good tools may grant a small bonus just as inferior tools may incur a small penalty.

Sneak
Crooks are sneaky by necessity. Whether breaking in somewhere or sneaking past a sleeping security guard, stealth is sometimes the name of the game. Almost anyone can move quietly or hide when there is adequate cover but the Crook takes these skills to the professional level.
12 limit: 10+ level+Dex bonus.
20 limit: 10+1/2 level+Dex bonus.
This roll can be modified b the DM for circumstances such as heavy or light cover, darkness, camouflage, creaky boards underfoot, etc.

Detective
Anyone who uses their intellect to solve crimes or find missing persons or items. This class represents the consulting detective, the police detective, the inquiry agent, etc.
Hit Die Type 1d6 per level up to 9th, +1 hp at 10+.
Armor Permitted: Any
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% xp bonus) Cha 13+

Assess
The Detective can use this ability to observe a person for a single round and then make a conclusion as to that persons age, character level, nationality, recent activities, etc based on the Detective's experience and training.
12 limit: 10+ level+Dex bonus.
20 limit: 10+1/2 level+Dex bonus.

Contacts
With a successful Charisma check the Detective may ask one favor of a contact such as a county coroner to view a body, a lawman to talk to a prisoner, etc. The favor will be things not generaly available to the average citizen. The contact will not endanger himself or his employment and may negotiate a payment or favor in return if the request by the Detective is difficult or unpleasant.
The Detective receives a bonus to the Charisma check at higher levels:
12 limit: 3, 6, 9, and 12.
20 limit: 5, 10, 15, and 20

He may call upon these contacts twice per adventure at first level. He may add an extra time
for each bonus to his Charisma check due to higher levels.

Deduction
The Detective, after reviewing clues, interviewing witnesses, visiting crime scenes, etc can make a Deduction check.
12 limit: 10+ level+Int bonus..
20 limit: 10+1/2 level+Int bonus.

If successful the Detective may ask the DM a single yes or no question which the DM must answer honestly. The Detective can do this once per adventure at 1st level and can ask more questions at higher levels.
12 limit: 3, 6, 9, and 12.
20 limit: 5, 10, 15, and 20

Observation
The Detective has a keen eye for details in the world around him. When actively looking for clues or other hidden objects he has a 1-2 on a 1d6 of finding them. These could be hidden bloodstains, footprints, hidden doors, hearing noise, etc. The DM can modify this for difficulty.

Minister
Priests and Ministers of all faiths. These are the special men whom are touched by some sort of divinity and manifest seemingly miraculous leadership and guidance. They also have the power to turn beings of darkness and legend.
Hit Die Type 1d6 per level up to 9th, +1 hp at 10+.
Armor Permitted: Any
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% xp bonus) Wis 13+

Influence Reactions
The Minister can, when speaking before a group that is not attacking (and not intending to attack in just seconds), try to alter the mood of the listeners. He can try to soften their mood or make it uglier. The method can be whatever is most suitable to the situation at the moment -- a fire and brimstone speech, a gentle reminder and guiding advice from the gospels, or an impassioned plea to the crowd's morals are but a few examples.. Everyone in the group listening must roll a saving throw vs. paralyzation (if the crowd is large, make saving throws for groups of people using average hit dice). The die roll is modified by -1 for every three experience levels of the Minister (round fractions down). If the saving throw fails, the group's reaction can be shifted one level  toward either the friendly or hostile end of the scale, at the player's option. Those who make a successful saving throw have their reaction shifted one level toward the opposite end of the scale.

Inspire
Sermons, stories, anecdotes, and personal appeal of the Minister can be inspirational, rallying friends and allies. If the exact nature of an impending threat is known, the Minister can heroically inspire his companions with a rousing sermon or speech, granting a +1 bonus to attack rolls, or a +1 bonus to saving throws, or a +2 bonus to morale (particularly useful in large battles) to those involved in melee. The Minister must spend at least three full rounds talking to his allies before the battle begins. This affects those within a range of 20 feet per experience level of the Minister.

The effect lasts one round per level. Once the effect wears off, it can't be renewed if the recipients are still in battle. However, those who have withdrawn from combat can be inspired again by the words. A troop of soldiers, inspired by the Minister, could charge into battle. After fighting a fierce fight, they retreat and the enemy does not pursue.

The Minister, seeing them crestfallen and dispirited, once again rouses their will to fight. Reinvigorated, they charge back into battle with renewed spirit

Bless, Prayer, Protection from Evil
Through the power of faith, prayer, and his will the Minister can cast each of these spells once at 1st level and an extra time at 4th, 8th, 12th, 16th, and 20th levels.
The spells function as written in the base rule books.

Turn
The Minister can attempt to turn as a Cleric of equal level. This ability works on more than just undead. It also affects demons, fey, and other hostile creatures of legend. As long as the creatures are of Neutral or Chaotic alignment, the Minister (of any Alignment) can attempt to turn them. The DM has final say on whom or what can be affected.

Physician
The humble country Physician to the London surgeon. This is the one to see when you
are sick or wounded.
Hit Die Type 1d6 per level up to 9th, +1 hp at 10+.
Armor Permitted: Any
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% experience bonus): Intelligence 13+

Diagnose
The Physician can make a Diagnose check to diagnose the illness of a patient, giving him information on proper treatment of the illness and a bonus on any further checks with that patient.
12 limit: 10+ level+Int bonus..
20 limit: 10+1/2 level+Int bonus.

The DM can modify this with a penalty based on insidious or obscure conditions.
Bonuses for success are: +1 hp per Healing dice on the patient and a +2 on Stabilization checks.

Healing
A Physician may heal 1d6 points of hit points damage per wound once per day per level. Only one healing attempt can be used on a wound. You cannot use the same healing on a wound twice. You cannot heal it again the next day. For example, a first level Physician could heal one wound per day. At third level he could heal three different wounds per day, be it three people once or the same person three times in the same 24 hours, provided that person was wounded on three separate occasions. This healing can be used for not only combat damage, but also disease, poison, and any other type of damage which affects hit points.
A patient under a Physician's care heals twice the number of hp per day with natural healing.

Stabilization
A Physician can try to control bleeding, rub their limbs, apply brandy, breathe into their mouth, etc and stabilize any character that has reached 0 or fewer hits points, and would otherwise be dead. The Physician must reach the victim within a number of rounds equal to the Physician's level up to tenth level , beginning on the round after he drops to 0 or below.

Once the Physician has reached the patient, he must then make a check with a -1 penalty for every hit point below 0.
12 limit: 10+ level+Int bonus..
20 limit: 10+1/2 level+Int bonus.

If he succeeds in this, the character is stabilized and does not die. If the victim is wounded again, another Stabilization can be made but with a +4 penalty in addition to normal bonuses and penalties, representing the shock of additional wounds to the body.

Scholar
This class covers educated men such as alienists, scientists, researchers, etc.
Hit Die Type 1d6 per level up to 9th, +1 hp at 10+.
Armor Permitted: Any
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% experience bonus): Intelligence 13+

Field of Study
At first level the Scholar may choose two fields of study to research. The Scholar will be familiar with the basics such as proven facts, theories, and how to conduct studies and experiments in their chosen fields.
The fields of study include (but are not limited to):

Anthropology
The study of of human cultures by interaction of intense study of written accounts of the culture and ancient records. An example of a successful roll is allowing the anthropologist to understand the cultures traditions as well as predict behavior.

Archaeology
The study of past cultures by excavating artifacts and relics from ancient sites. Studying the remains allows the archaeologist to learn about the people's customs, way of life, etc. An example of a successful roll is allowing the Archaeologist to spot fake antiquities or figure out what an ancient civilization used a certain religious site for.

Biology
The study of all forms of life, plant and animal. The biologist will understand structures of plant and animals as well as behaviors. Includes information on botany, microbiology, and zoology. An example of a successful roll is allowing the biologist to recall pertinent information such as hunting tactics for lions or if a rare known plant is poisonous.

Chemistry
Identifying, predicting, and creating chemical compounds and reactions. With the proper materials the chemist can create substances such as poisons, explosives, or to a chemical analysis of a substance. An example of a successful roll is allowing the chemist to run tests on a dried crimson stain to determine if it is blood or how to make primitive gunpowder or explosives from available resources.

Electricity
A young science in the Victorian age, the study of electricity and electrical device allows the scholar to understand the nature and uses of electrical power as well as repair and fabrication of electrical devices. An example of a successful roll is allowing the electrical engineer to repair a malfunctioning laboratory electrical device or wire an electric trap without shocking himself.

Engineering
The skills to understand, repair, and even build complex mechanical devices. Steam, hydro, and wind power are the major power sources available. An example of a successful roll is allowing the engineer to find the weakest spot in a fortified wall to receive the maximum effect of an explosive or the repair of a damaged steam locomotive engine.

Geology
The study of the earth's surface formation, composition, and changes. Geologists can use their knowledge to identify fossils, minerals and soils, and anticipate such events as volcanic or seismic activity. An example of a successful roll is allowing the geologist to estimate if a rocky outcropping is safe to climb or where a certain type of rare soil or rock came from with analysis.

History
Knowledge of the past including places, people, events, and customs. If the knowledge is obscure a penalty may be required on the roll. An example of a successful roll is allowing the historian to recall the bloody history of an ancient warlord or the origins of certain customs and superstitions.

Mesmerism
The ability to place a willing subject into a trance. The subject must be willing, the two must be in a quiet place without interruption, a focus such as a ring or candles much be used, and the attempt will take 1d6 minutes. If successful the subject will be lulled into a sleep-like state.

The mesmerist can ask questions, each requiring a check, each with a cumulative 1 penalty to the check per question past the first. The subject will have nearly total recall of past events and cannot lie  or deceive although their perception may color their answer.

With an ability check the mesmerist can implant a post hypnotic suggestion. The subject will perform this without apparent thought or conscious decision. It may involve a specific time (when you get home) or a trigger phrase (good morning.) Spells or other complex activities such as picking locks cannot be used as a suggestion. It must be something simple such as dropping or swiping an object into the subject's coat or saying a phrase which was implanted.

Other uses may be implemented, probably with penalties, by the DM.

Occult Lore
The study of occult and forbidden subjects including folklore, magic theory, historical events, people, places, etc. The Occultist can identify spells and rituals by studying the remains of components or effect of the spell. He can identify possible creatures from behavior patterns, tactics, and wounds. He can identify occult items, grimoires, and relics with a successful check. An example of a successful roll is allowing the occultist to identify a vampire's attacks by studying the time of attack, marks on the victim, etc.

Physics
The study and understanding of the physical forces and laws of nature such as light, sound, heat, cold, magnetism, gravity, etc. It allows the physicist to predict how materials will react when these forces are applied to them. It also covers knowledge of mathematics and the hypothetical subjects of other dimensions, time travel, etc associated with theoretical physics. This ability is often used in conjunction with Electricity and Engineering. With a successful physics roll a +2 bonus is applied to the Electricity or Engineering roll. Another example of a successful roll would be the following: The characters investigate a cultists lair. Despite solid stone walls and only one exit the cultists escaped. The physicist sees half marred chalk scribblings on the wall that look strikingly similar to a theoretical physics formula he has seen. With a successful roll he manages to reproduce the scribblings into a coherent formula matching what was in the wall. A gate to another dimension suddenly opens before him, the cultists escape route.

Psychology
Victorian psychologists are referred to as Alienists. They have training in the care of persons with mental disorders. Such training includes diagnosis of probable causes of mental illness as well as treatments ranging from simple therapy to drug treatments.

Other fields of study are available at the DM's discretion.
The base chance for success is
12 limit: 10+ level+Int bonus..
20 limit: 10+1/2 level+Int bonus.

This roll can be modified by the DM for circumstances such as a bonus for common  information or penalty for more obscure information in the field.

As he gains levels the Scholar acquires new fields of study.
12 limit: 3, 6, 9, and 12.
20 limit: 4th, 8th, 12th, 16th, and 20th.

These additional fields are calculated as if the Scholar is at first level when he gains each new one. The new field chances advance normally from there.

Research
The Scholar is an expert in finding information from libraries, archives, newspaper morgues, and other files. He can find information about nearly any subject if given access to the proper records and the information is there to be found. Examples of such information is discovering old documents such as wills, deeds, rare information, patterns of missing or false files, etc.
The base chance for success is
12 limit: 10+ level+Int bonus..
20 limit: 10+1/2 level+Int bonus.

In addition, with a successful roll, he can add a +4 bonus to fields of study relevant to the information being researched for the remainder of the adventure.



Saturday, September 3, 2016

OSR in the American West. Traditional and Spaghetti Western Rules Redux.



Much like my redone fantasy classes there has been a bit more play testing and revision for my Western games rules, primarily class revisions of certain abilities and the inclusion of the Detective and Pugilist classes.

The original post can be found here.

The Spaghetti Western vs  Traditional Westerns:
The game can be run one of two way: the Clint Eastwood, Italian Spaghetti Westerns which were focused on style and violence or the traditional John Wayne, Randolph Scott westerns which were grounded in more 'realism' and fun action. This last category also includes TV shows such as Bonanza, Wanted Dead or Alive, the Rifleman, etc.

Spaghetti Western heroes are almost superhuman in their abilities to fast draw, shoot accurately, and take damage and survive. Traditional Westerns are often more focused on character than combat, although that is an integral part of the genre. Traditional Western characters are closer to real life folk in their skills and durability.  To reflect this I implement the following:

Attribute Bonuses/Penalties:
Either the standard Swords & Wizardry +1 or Labyrinth Lord’s +1 to +3.
For Traditional: I prefer the S&W method.
For Spaghetti's: I prefer the latter as it gives a wider range to class special abilities and to Fast Draw.

Hit Points
Maximum hp at first level.
OPTION: For grittier Western games, especially a very Traditional or historical based game, you can even limit the characters' hp's to a maximum of 5 levels.
Hit bonus, Saving Throws, etc all continue past level 5, but the characters hp are maxed out at 5.

Level Limit 
12 or 20 based on Campaign type.
For more Traditional games the characters are limited to level 12. They are still competent but do not reach the more pulpish or cinematic characters of a Spaghetti Westerns  level 20 game. In Traditional Westerns even the best heroes are rarely beyond level 5 or 6 in skill. Higher levels than this should be ultra-rare, perhaps the best in the West.

For Both Genres:
Armor Class
Normal Armor class, and modifiers are used.
Firearms ignore the first four points of personal armor. For example: Plate –6 [+6] would only give protection of –2 [+2].

Attack
+1 hit/level (Max +15) or use Base Rule Books bonus as a Fighter. You're call. I prefer the former to keep up with NPC's, creatures in combat.

Class Ability Formula 
Traditional: 10+ level+Ability Score Bonus.
Spaghetti: 10+1/2 level+Ability Score Bonus.
Untrained: Ability check for Riding, Climbing, etc, 5 + Ability
Modifier for trained Abilities such as Open Locks, Tracking, etc.
DM will add or subtract modifiers for ease/difficulty of task.

Experience
Each class advances as a Fighter.

Multiclassing 
Multiclassing is allowed for a stronger skill set. To hit bonuses and Hit Points add on normally. For Saving Throws take the best of the two classes. Class abilities do not stack use the best of both.

Saving Throw(s)
As Fighter

Starting Money
Characters begin with 3d6 x $20 as first level characters. Characters starting off at higher levels receive an amount of beginning money equal to 3d6 + the characters level x $40 or whatever their DM feels is appropriate to the game.

Character Classes
Cowboy
Detective
Gambler
Gunslinger
Lawman
Pugilist
Scout
Soldier

Cowboy (Cowpoke, Singing Cowboy, Gaucho, Cavalry, etc.)
Hit Die Type 1d8, After reaching 10 hit dice, the Cowboy gains only 2 hit point per level
Armor Permitted: Any
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% experience bonus): Con 13+

Riding
A Dexterity check to guide his animal. This includes situations such as staying mounted while the horse is bucking or upset, calming and controlling the horse, guide it with his knees so the rider can shoot or rope, etc.
The Cowboy gets to add a +1 bonus to Riding Dexterity checks at first level and at later levels.
Traditional: 3, 6, 9, and 12 
Spaghetti: 5, 10, 15, and 20 

In addition, the Cowboy can do the following:
Use his Dex bonus to increase his mount's AC.
With a successful check, the Cowboy can drop along the side of the horse for cover, gaining a +4 cover bonus to his AC.

With a successful check the Cowboy can fall from a horse and take half damage (see Riding in Rules Clarifications: Miscellaneous.)

With a successful check the Cowboy can coax the horse to leap obstacles and the Cowboy
can hang on while the animal is performing the maneuver.

Roping
The Cowboy receives a +2 bonus with the lariat (ranged attack).

Shooter
Being proficient with arms is a necessity on the trail. With snakes, coyotes, bandits, and rustlers you have to learn to defend yourself.
The Cowboy receives a +1 to hit with firearms. 

Stamina
Riding the range toughens a man. +2 to Saving Throws vs disease and poison.

Detective (Pinkertons, Reporters, Lawyers, Private Investigators, etc.)
Hit Die Type 1d6 per level up to 9th, +1 hp at 10+.
Armor Permitted: Any
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% xp bonus) Int 13+

Assess
The Detective can use this ability to observe a person for a single round and then make a conclusion as to that persons age, character level, nationality, recent activities, etc based on the Detective's experience and training. 
Traditional: 10+ level+Int bonus.
Spaghetti: 10+1/2 level+Int bonus.

Contacts
With a successful Charisma check the Detective may ask one favor of a contact such as a county coroner to view a body, a lawman to talk to a prisoner, etc. The favor will be things not generaly available to the average citizen. The contact will not endanger himself or his employment and may negotiate a payment or favor in return if the request by the Detective is difficult or unpleasant. 
The Detective recieves a bonus to the Charisma check at higher levels:
Traditional: 3, 6, 9, and 12 
Spaghetti: 5, 10, 15, and 20 

He may call upon these contacts twice per adventure at first level. He may add an extra time
for each bonus to his Charisma check due to higher levels. 

Deduction
The Detective, after reviewing clues, interviewing witnesses, visiting crime scenes, etc can make a Deduction check.
Traditional: 10+ level+Int bonus.
Spaghetti: 10+1/2 level+Int bonus.

If successful the Detective may ask the DM a single yes or no question which the DM must answer honestly. The Detective can do this once per adventure at 1st level and can ask more questions at higher levels.
Traditional: 3, 6, 9, and 12 
Spaghetti: 5, 10, 15, and 20 

Observation
The Detective has a keen eye for details in the world around him. When actively looking for clues or other hidden objects he has a 1-2 on a 1d6 of finding them. These could be hidden bloodstains, footprints, hidden doors, hearing noise, etc. The DM can modify this for difficulty. 

Gambler (Gambler, Con-Man, Thief, etc.)
Hit Die Type 1d6, After reaching 10 hit dice, the Gambler gains only 1 hit point per level
Armor Permitted: Leather or lighter.
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% xp bonus) Int 13+
Backstab
When attacking with surprise, from behind, the Gambler gains +4 to hit and inflicts double damage. At levels 5-8, damage is tripled, and from a Gambler above level 8 such an attack inflicts quadruple damage.

Fast Talk
With a bit of conversation, the Gambler is able to attempt to befriend, persuade, charm, or outright con an individual to his way of thinking. After 2d6 minutes of cajoling, flattering, drinking, etc. the victim of the Fast Talk must make a Saving Throw. This Saving Throw has a cumulative -1 as the Gambler gains higher levels.
Traditional: 3, 6, 9, and 12 
Spaghetti: 5, 10, 15, and 20 

Gambling
A gambler, a card sharp and sometimes a cheat, supplementing his living by the cards, dice, and his wits. At 1st level and at 3rd, 6th, 9th, and 12th the Gambler gains a cumulative +1 bonus to his gambling checks.

Hear Noise
The Gambler has honed his senses to work better in the dark. His chance to hear noise is 3 in 6 at first level increasing to 4 in 6 at 3rd level, 5 in 6 at 7th level, and 6 in 6 at 10th level. 
To use this ability he must stop all activity and concentrate.

Open Locks
Gamblers are skilled at picking locks, opening safes, etc. Some are difficult and may require a penalty to the open roll. 
Traditional: 10+ level+Dex bonus.
Spaghetti: 10+1/2 level+Dex bonus.
Good tools may grant a small bonus just as inferior tools may incur a small penalty.

Pick Pocket
The Gambler is often called upon to manipulate small objects, such as a card, coin, derringer, or small knife in his line of work, as well as picking the occasional pocket. 
Traditional: 10+ level+Dex bonus.
Spaghetti: 10+1/2 level+Dex bonus.

If the Gambler fails his roll the victim has a 1-2 in 6 chance of detecting the manipulation, pick pocket attempt, etc. A Dex bonus will drop the chance to 1 in 6.

 If the Gambler rolls a natural 20, he has been spotted by his victim or victims if he is picking a pocket, cheating, etc.

Gunslinger (Gunman, Bounty Hunter, etc)
Hit Die Type 1d8, After reaching 10 hit dice, the Gunslinger gains only 2 hit point per level
Armor Permitted: Any
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% xp bonus) Dex 13+

Fast Draw
The Gunslinger gains a cumulative +1 bonus to Fast Draw initiative at first level and later levels. See below.
Traditional: 3, 6, 9, and 12 
Spaghetti: 5, 10, 15, and 20 

The Gunslinger does not receive a -4 penalty to attack for drawing a weapon and attacking in the same round.

If group initiative is used, the Gunslinger still rolls for individual iniative (1d6+Dex Bonus.)

Fast Draw initiative is different than normal initiative. Roll 1d6 + Dex bonus + Gunslinger bonus. However, against opponents who already have their weapons in hand, the initiative total is considered to be half (round up.) The usually high Gunslinger Dex and the Gunslinger’s Fast Draw bonus will still beat many foes who are already armed and ready, even at half the normal value. Therefore, if facing down a Gunslinger who has a holstered weapon and his partner who has a pistol in hand, you would have your full Fast Draw initiative vs. the holstered gun, but only half of the number vs. the pistol already in hand.

Shooter
The bread and butter of the Gunslinger. He receives a +1 to hit with firearms. 

Steely Gaze
At 1st level, the Gunslinger can intimidate a number of creatures with HD equal to his level.
The creatures must be able to see the Gunslinger’s stare to be affected. The creatures are allowed a Saving Throw to avoid this effect. Those that fail suffer a –2 to all attacks on the Gunslinger. Most will flee; only the most determined will stay and fight.
This ability can be used once per day per level.

Lawman (Sheriff, Texas Ranger, Pinkerton, etc.)
Hit Die Type 1d8, After reaching 10 hit dice, the Lawman gains only 2 hit point per level
Armor Permitted: Any
Weapons Permitted: An
Prime Attribute (5% xp bonus) Cha 13+

Badge
The Lawman has authority and can use it. He can arrest anyone who has committed a crime or who he suspects of committing a crime and hold them for trial. Once per day per level, he can attempt to use his authority to intimidate one person. If the victim fails a Saving Throw, he will obey the order given by the Lawman, be it drop his gun, come with the Lawman, etc. 
The victim will never do anything irrational, such as shooting himself or his friends. 

Deputies
The Lawman  can deputize and pay a posse. The number of deputies is limited to the characters Charisma score plus half of his level (round up), and it is recommended that most are first level characters. None will be of a higher level than the Lawman. The posse will stay with the Lawman for a number of days equal to 1d3 days plus his Charisma bonus. They will be loyal up to a point: nobody is going to stick for very long with a man who is making poor decisions and probably leading them to their death.

Knowledge
Through both informants and official channels, the Lawman is often in the know on important information, both locally and territorial. Such pertinent information may include who a famous gunman may be, who started a feud with who, or if the mysterious stranger who just rode in town is wanted. The base chance for success is 
Traditional: 3, 6, 9, and 12 
Spaghetti: 5, 10, 15, and 20 

Shooter
Lawmen have to be able to defend themselves and their citizens.
He receives a +1 to hit with firearms. 

Pugilist (Boxer, Brawler, Martial Artist, etc.)
Hit Die Type 1d8, After reaching 10 hit dice, the Pugilist gains only 2 hit points per level
Armor: The Pugilist only gains his AC bonus and Combo ability if in leather or lighter.
Weapons Permitted: Any
Prime Attribute (5% xp bonus) Dex 13+

Fisticuffs (Unarmed Combat)
The Pugilist hits harder and more often with his natural weapons and can defend against Melee/Unarmed attacks better than most other characters.

He gains a +1 to hit with Unarmed Attacks and receives the following bonuses while in Melee/Unarmed Combat.
Combo
The Pugilist can attack with two unarmed attacks around at no penalty. This ability can  only be used if he is only doing two unarmed attacks. It cannot be mixed with a melee or ranged attack. Use normal two-weapon rules for those situations.

KO 
Once per day per 2 levels (round up) the Pugilist can fire off a haymaker/power kick/etc. 
The attack is made at a -2 penalty to hit. If successful the damage is x2, x3 if a natural 20 is rolled. 

Second Wind
If the Pugilist takes a full round to rest he can regain 1d4 hit points. He must do no other action in this round but rest. He cannot defend himself. His AC is 10 + light armor modifier; he receives no Dex or Fisticuffs bonus.
This ability can be used a limited number of times per day.
Traditional: 3, 6, 9, and 12 
Spaghetti: 5, 10, 15, and 20 

Scout (Army Scout, Mountain Man, Tracker, etc.)
Hit Die Type 1d6+1, After reaching 10 hit dice, the Scout gains only 1 hit point per level
Prime Attribute (5% xp bonus) Dex 13+

Awareness
One of the most important abilities of the Scout is his sharp senses. The ability to detect
danger is one of the key abilities of the and can make the difference between life and death.
-1 to be surprised.
+1 to surprise.

Backstab
The Scout, once he has found his target, is adept at attacking from surprise to kill the prey.
+4 to attack. x2 damage. x3 damage at levels 5-8. x4 damage at 9th level.
This also includes ranged attacks until the target(s) are aware they are being fired upon.

Survival
The Scout's ability to live off of the land and survive, this check is rolled in addition to normal foraging rolls. The DM may modify this check for plentiful or exceptionally harsh terrain. 
Traditional: 10+ level+Int bonus. 
Spaghetti: 10+1/2 level+Int bonus.

Track
Scouts are also capable trackers, often employed as guides and hunters. This roll can be modified by the DM for circumstances such as tracking across soft mud, tracking across snow, the quarry is trying to hide their tracks, etc. 
Traditional: 10+ level+Wis bonus.
Spaghetti: 10+1/2 level+Wis bonus.

Soldier (Military, Fighter, Brave, etc.)
Hit Die Type 1d8, After reaching 10 hit dice, the Soldier gains only 2 hit points per level
Prime Attribute (5% xp bonus) Str 13+
Defense
The Soldier is better at avoiding damaging due to dodging, blocking, parrying, etc.
+1 to AC.

Melee Fighter
Gains a +1 to attack with melee weapons.

Shooter
He receives a +1 to hit with firearms. 

WEAPONS AND RULES
The firearm categories have been kept as generic as possible. Unless the weapon is a gimmick, it does not matter what make or model it is. Only that it is a lethal weapon in the hands of the hero. For game purposes we are only concerned with initiative, rate of fire, range, damage, type of ammunition for reloading times, and how many bullets/charges the firearm holds.

Initiative
Normal combat initiative is 1d6 + Dex bonus. The Gunslinger’s Fast Draw bonus only applies to Fast Draw initiative.

Fast Draw Initiative 
Fast Draw initiative is different than normal initiative. Roll 1d6 + Dex bonus + Gunslinger bonus. However, against opponents who already have their weapons in hand, the initiative total is considered to be half (round up.) The usually high Gunslinger Dex and the Gunslinger’s Fast Draw bonus will still beat many foes who are already armed and ready, even at half the normal value. Therefore, if facing down a Gunslinger who has a holstered weapon and his partner who has a pistol in hand, you would have your full Fast Draw initiative vs. the holstered gun, but only half of the number vs. the pistol already in hand.

 Fast Draw Initiative: Equipment Modifiers
Short Barrel +1 Fast Draw Initiative, extra –1 to range penalties
Long Barrel -1 to Fast Draw Initiative, +1 bonus to range penalties
Flap/Army Holster -1 to Fast Draw Initiative
Fast Draw Holster 0 penalty to Fast Draw Initiative
Swivel Rig 0 penalty to Fast Draw Initiative
Spring-sleeve Holster +1 to Fast Draw Initiative

Rate of Fire
Anyone can make one attack per round with no penalty.

Single Action Pistols
The shooter can make two attacks with a -3 penalty per shot.

Double Action Pistols
With a double-action pistol, the gunman cannot fan the hammer, but he can take two shots per round with a –2 per shot.

Fan the Hammer/Flick the Lever
Holding down on the trigger and fanning the hammer of a single-action revolver with your off hand or quickly flicking the lever and pulling the trigger of a lever-action carbine or rifle to fire rapidly.
3 attacks, -4 per attack.

Gatling/Automatics
Can fire 3 per round with no penalty per shot  or 6  per combat round with a –4 penalty per shot.

Aiming with Firearms
Take a round, gain a +2 bonus to one shot. This can be done for two straight rounds for a total bonus of +4.

Two Weapons
0 penalty primary hand, -4 off hand.

Range
Firearms have five range increments, and suffer a standard –2 penalty per increment after the first.

Damage
The damage for firearms depends on which type of Western you are running.
For Traditional use the standard multi-polyhedron dice for non-open ended damage.
For Spaghetti's the damage uses d6's and is open-ended: if you roll a six on the dice, roll it again and add the dice. Do this until you don’t get anymore sixes.
The damage listed before the backslash is for Traditional, damage after is for Spaghetti.

Ammunition Type and Reloading
A cartridge weapon can be reloaded with three bullets per round. No other action except movement can be attempted while reloading. However, a shooter can, if desperate, reload one shell and attack with a –4 penalty for rushing the attack.

Cap and ball firearms require two rounds to load a single load, or one round to replace a cylinder. No other action except movement may be attempted when reloading. If you’re reloading pistol loads one at a time, you cannot move faster than a walk and still reload. Cylinders can be reloaded on the run,

Firearms which require a magazine (Gatling) take only one round to reload and ready. However a desperate shooter can hurry the reload and attack with a -4 penalty in addition to normal penalties for rushing the attack.

Firearms Categories
Pistols
Most pistols of the mid-to-late 1800’s are single-action revolvers. Double-actions exist, but are not as common and are more costly, not replacing the single-action until the end of the century. Most pistols hold six bullets, although some rare models, such as the LeMat revolver, held up to 9 shots. Most of these non-six shooters suffered from delicate mechanical parts or odd caliber bullets which were difficult to find and purchase. Almost all revolvers during the Civil War are cap and ball, with the rare exception such as the LeMat and it’s hard to find ammo. Derringers were fairly common, multi-barreled small pocket pistols, easily hidden and often used as a means of last resort self defense.

Rifles
Rifles come in a large variety of forms and are chambered for large rifle rounds. Civil war rifles were almost universally cap and ball single shot rifles. Later, when metallic cartridges became widely available, many of the older single shot were modified to accept the new ammunition. Unlike the smaller cartridge repeating rifles below, those chambered for rifle cartridges held only six shots.

The first widely produced repeating rifles were the smaller cartridge 7 shot Spencer rifle and the 15 shot Henry. Before these came about, there was the rare cap and ball revolving rifle such as the 6 shot Colt Revolving Rifle, and the Spencer and Henry Rifles gave way to the more reliable 15 shot Winchester Rifles.

The Buffalo rifle is a powerful weapon, often used to bring down large game such as bear, elk, and most famously, buffalo. The most common such rifle is the Sharps big single shot .50. European models exist as large-bore elephant rifles (1 shot or 2 shot for double barrel models) used for safari to bring down big game such as rhino and elephant.

Carbines
Carbines are essentially shortened rifles, often chambered with pistol cartridges, and made for ease of use while in the saddle or on a wagon. During the Civil War, many were cap and ball models, with the occasional metallic cartridge carbine. Like rifles, carbines come in all types: single shot (1 shot Military Carbine), revolving cylinder (6 shot Colt Revolving Carbine), and lever action (7 shot Spencer Carbine, 12 shot Winchester).

Heavy carbines are carbines chambered with a larger cartridges, specifically lower-velocity rifle rounds. The larger rounds only allow for 6 bullets to be loaded in the repeating models.

Shotguns
Most common shotguns were 16 gauge. Models are single barrel, double barrel, or the very rare 5 shot revolving shotgun (Colt.) In the late 1880’s lever action shotguns were introduced (5 shot) and in the 1890’s pump, or slide-action, shotguns first appeared (5 shots).

Coach guns were shorter barrel versions of the shotgun, named so because of their use on guards riding “shotgun” on stagecoaches. They are much easier to use on horseback than a regular shotgun, and most shotguns in the hands of gunmen, outlaws, and lawmen will be these shorter models.

Sawed off shotguns have their barrels cut extremely short, often with most of the stock removed, to form a lethal pistol sized shotgun.

Gatling Gun
The most famous repeat-fire weapon of the west. Capable of throwing out a tremendous amount of bullets, it was hand-crank operated, had multiple rotating barrels which facilitated cooling and synchronized the load-fire process, and had a top fed 50 shot magazine. After 1871 a 400 shot ammo drum was available.
Expensive and deadly, it is rarely seen outside of the military.

My post on unusual weapons found in the Spaghetti Westerns can be found here

MISCELLANEOUS
Binding Wounds
As this is inherently a no magic setting, it is recommended that this optional rule is used, allowing characters to regain 1d4 hit points  immediately after combats.

Gambling
1d6 + Int modifier, highest roll wins. Modifiers such as the Gamblers gambling ability apply.

Cheating
Dexterity check for a +1 bonus.
 A Gambler may substitute his Pick Pockets roll if he has a better chance.

 If the cheater fails his roll the victim has a 1-2 in 6 chance of detecting the manipulation, pick pocket attempt, etc. A Dex bonus will drop the chance to 1 in 6.

 If the cheater rolls a natural 20, he has been spotted by his victim or victims.

Riding
Dexterity check with modifiers as decided by the DM.
Falling off a moving horse or wagon does damage depending on the horses movement. For careful the damage is 1d4, for walking the damage is 1d6, and for running the damage is 2d6.

Roping
Normal ranged attack roll with a range of 30’. Once roped, the target can immediately make a Saving Throw at –4 to slip out of the lariat. If the victim fails, he or it is hooked on the cowboys line and can be dragged for 1d6. To avoid this the victim can immediately make a Str check (-4) vs. the cowboy’s Str to pull the rope out of the cowboy’s hands.

A called shot at –4 can be made to rope a leg, weapon, etc. The victim must make a penalized Str roll, as above, vs. the cowboy’s strength to retain a weapon, not have a leg pulled out from under him, etc.

Stampede!
If the character is caught in a stampede, he can either take cover or get stomped.
Sturdy cover such as a large boulder, tree, or a good thick wall will protect the character.
If no cover is available, the character can try to kill one of the stampeding animals and take cover behind its carcass. If this happens, the character automatically takes only half damage and can make a Saving Throw to take no damage at all.

If no cover is available the character takes 6d6 damage as he is stomped and gored by the panicked herd.